Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Latest news and features from theguardian.com, the world's leading liberal voice

older | 1 | 2 | 3 | (Page 4) | 5 | newer

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Kevin Waldron has made the fearsome Shere Khan from hand-torn paper, depicting the scene where he lies in wait for Mowgli at the mouth of the wolves’ cave

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Ian Andrew took inspiration from the landscape in his native Dorset and hid the characters in the rocky environment

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Prabha Mallya depicts Raksha – also known as Mother Wolf – defending Mowgli from the fearsome Shere Khan

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    In Kipling’s stories, the superiority of man is stated with a harshness that will startle those whose only image of Mowgli comes courtesy of Disney

    Disney and the director Jon Favreau have done a spectacular job of realising their new version of The Jungle Book using the sort of sophisticated digital effects familiar from Life of Pi. The only human visible on screen in Favreau’s movie is the man-cub Mowgli, played by the 10-year-old newcomer Neel Sethi. He fraternises convincingly with computer-generated animals including Bagheera the Panther (Ben Kingsley) and the fearsome tiger Shere Khan (Idris Elba).

    What no one involved in the project seems to have noticed is the irony of putting all this expensive, cutting-edge technology in the service of a story which sentimentalises the primitivism lurking within civilisation. It’s rather like cooking an enormous fry-up to mark the start of Healthy Eating Week, or throwing a decadent bash to promote austerity.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Lesley Barnes depicts her favourite character, Bagheera the panther with his companion Mowgli

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Sarah McIntyre illustrates her writing partner Philip Reeve’s favourite element of the book: Mowgli’s relationship with Baloo and Bagheera

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Bill Bragg captures the dark and wild nature of Mowgli and his animal companions, out on a moonlit adventure

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Robert G Fresson depicts a quiet moment between Mowgli and Bagheera, before they vanish into the jungle’s secret places

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Each day, artists illustrate a scene from Rudyard Kipling’s classic The Jungle Book. Here Marta Altés draws Mowgli telling Bagheera about his language lessons with Baloo

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    With Rudyard Kipling’s children’s classic The Jungle Book back in everyone’s minds, we approached 10 artists and illustrators to recreate their favourite scene or character from the book

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    We received some fantastic entries to our contest for young writers inspired by the ever-popular tales. Now it is time to reveal the winner …

    Earlier this year, we asked our favourite illustrators and artists to reimagine a scene from The Jungle Book. The results were so wonderful that we asked children to reimagine their favourite characters from the ever-popular tales in an original short story – our only prerequisite was that the story be as original and interesting as possible.

    The runners-up were four lovely pieces of writing, so it was very hard to pick a winner. We also really liked Lola’s story about the Bandar-log, with its clever twists at the end.

    But we think the overall winner is Katie, because the fish village, with all its funny little details, is such a thoughtful and original idea. We’d love to see some illustrations of it!

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Ian Jack (We remembered the battle of Jutland, but we are losing our awe of the sea, 4 June) forgot one great poem about the Battle of Jutland – My Boy Jack by Rudyard Kipling. This is understandable because the poem has been wrongly identified and adopted as an elegy to Kipling’s son John, who lost his life at Loos on the western front in September 1915. However, John Kipling was never called “Jack”. Rather the poem mourned the loss of John (known as Jack) Cornwell, who won, as Ian Jack notes, a posthumous VC at Jutland.

    Kipling’s poem originally appeared with an article written in October 1916 called Destroyers at Jutland. It becomes a lament for all those who died at sea – particularly those at Jutland – and is made more universal by the connotation between “Jack” and “Jack Tar”, the common term for sailor. Kipling wrote widely about the sea – its physical dangers, its excitements and its contribution to Britain’s island history and sense of identity. Look at his poem The Harp Song of the Dane Women for a heart-rending cry about the cruelty of the sea, which robbed families of loved ones.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    From Tyger to Tigger, Lizzy Stewart picks her top tigers in fiction, of all different shapes, sizes and stripes

    The lion might be considered the King of Beasts but it’s the tiger that has always captured my imagination, perhaps as a result of a childhood spent with a particularly silly tabby-cat? Or an early encounter with Judith Kerr’s hungry house-guest? The tiger has often been a subject in my illustrations, and was an obvious subject when it came to writing and illustrating a picture book.

    There’s something in the feline-slink of a tiger’s movements, the simple graphic appeal of those black and orange stripes, the inviting symmetry of their faces; tigers just make great story characters! Hungry, friendly, fierce or playful, there are all kinds of tigers to be found in children’s books, but these are my absolute favourites...

    Related: My hero: Judith Kerr by Michael Rosen

    Related: The story of how Winnie the Pooh was inspired by a real bear – in pictures

    Related: Re-illustrating The Jungle Book: a paper Shere Khan by Kevin Waldron

    Related: Top 10 unlikely friendships in children’s books

    Related: Janis MacKay top 10 books set on the ocean

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Stephen Joseph theatre, Scarborough
    Rudyard Kipling’s famous bedtime tales are brought to life with a sink plunger, vacuum cleaner and, apparently, no actors

    Rudyard Kipling dreamed up the fanciful origin myths of the Just So Stories to put his daughter to sleep. He must have quickly come to regret it. As anyone familiar with a young child’s bedtime routine will know, they had to be repeated ad infinitum with no variation allowed. Kipling wrote in the preface to the first edition: “You were not allowed to alter these by one single word. They had to be told just so.”

    The tales of why the rhinoceros ended up with wrinkled skin, and how the camel got the hump have proved enduringly popular, though not all are in keeping with contemporary taste. The stories in which a prehistoric family gradually domesticate the wild beasts seem expressly designed to show that an Englishman’s cave was his castle. And some narratives are blatantly racist: you really don’t want to be reminded how Kipling suggested the leopard received his spots.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    29 July 1910: ‘A little protection about the head and shoulders might make all the difference between life and death’

    Mr. Rudyard Kipling contributes to this week’s number of “The Car” the foregoing diagrams illustrating an idea of his for a suit of pneumatic armour for the protection of flying men from injury by at any rate slighter falls. “A little protection about the head and shoulders,” he writes, “might make all the difference between life and death at the moment of the smash.”

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A wry, pastoral fantasy aimed at romantic types, this all-but forgotten poem irresistibly recalls one of the most famous. And arguably outdoes it

    OH! If the winds could whisper what they hear,
    When murmuring round at sunset through the grove;
    If words were written on the streamlet clear,
    So often spoken fearlessly above:
    If tell-tale stars, descending from on high,
    Could image forth the thoughts of all that gaze,
    Entranced upon that deep cerulean sky,
    And count how few think only of their rays!

    If the lulled heaving ocean could disclose
    All that has passed upon her golden sand,
    When the moon-lighted waves triumphant rose,
    And dashed their spray upon the echoing strand:
    If dews could tell how many tears have mixed
    With the bright gem-like drops that Nature weeps,
    If night could say how many eyes are fixed
    On her dark shadows, while creation sleeps!

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    The health secretary this week clumsily invoked Oliver Twist to scold doctors wanting more funds. So we wondered what other great words politicians could mangle?

    Health secretary Jeremy Hunt this week quoted Oliver Twist as he argued down pleas for more money for the health service, dismissing a report by the lobby group NHS Providers as amounting to saying: “There isn’t enough money, please sir, can I have some more?”

    It was presumably lost on Hunt that the bearer of the begging bowl is the hero of the piece – a small orphan living in that Victorian forerunner of the welfare state, the workhouse. Bearing in mind the political power of selective quotation, we have ransacked the annals of literature to find some more useful quotes, ready for misuse.

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    Exhibition reveals Victorian designer’s expertise, promotion of Punjabi arts, and lasting impact on son Rudyard

    If the teenage son of a Methodist preacher had not visited the Great Exhibition in 1851, The Jungle Book and other beloved works of Rudyard Kipling would probably never have been created. The awe-struck visitor was not the author but his father, John Lockwood Kipling, whose life was changed forever by the Indian treasures he saw on display at Crystal Palace, and whose passion for India profoundly influenced his son.

    Related: The 100 best novels: No 34 – Kim by Rudyard Kipling (1901)

    Related: Indian independence followed the second world war as European empires crumbled

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    A profound human experience – and also a brilliant plot device – adoption has inspired endless stories, from Shakespeare to Jeanette Winterson

    It’s easy to see why adoption is such a powerful source of storytelling. Mystery. Multiple identities. Families turned inside out.

    In my novel The Doll Funeral, Ruby finds out she’s adopted on her 13th birthday. When she hears the news, she runs out into her unkempt garden and sings for joy to the storm clouds, so awful has her life been up to that point. This is the jumping-off point for everything, and her subsequent search for her real parents ends up uncovering terrible secrets in both her own and others’ families.

    Related: Top 10 mothers, 'bad' and otherwise, in books

    Continue reading...

    0 0

    It is disingenuous of Shashi Tharoor to pretend that religious hatred did not exist in India before “the British introduced it” with their policy of “divide and rule” (A legacy of exploitation and ruin, G2, 9 March). He must know that when Mahmood of Ghazni first brought Islam to the subcontinent in the 10th century, his invasion involved incalculable violence, massive loss of life and a wanton destruction of Hindu religious sites on a scale that Islamic State could only dream of. The Mughals, who were Persian and never let their Hindu subjects forget it, were as foreign to India as the British.

    Those British were, of course, lucky that a power vacuum had been created by the collapse of the Mughal empire in the second half of the 18th century, which the well-organised East India Company was better able to fill than even such a warlike Hindu warrior caste as the Marathas. As George Orwell pointed out long ago, the Raj was indeed a racket run for the greedy benefit of about 1% of the UK’s population (true of all capitalism since about 1980). Nevertheless, there were great moments of civilization and glory, both for the eventually defeated conquerors and those who bravely resisted them, throughout the very short period (in Indian historical terms: 1600-1947) when the British were political players in India.

    Continue reading...

older | 1 | 2 | 3 | (Page 4) | 5 | newer